Everything Is Nice

Beating the nice nice nice thing to death (with fluffy pillows)

Coshed

leave a comment »

I just downloaded the 1939 Retro Hugo voter package which means I now have two unread packages to read before voting closes at the end of the month. It’s gonna be tight. Once I finish that, I’ve got two whole weeks to complete my next tranche of homework: preparing for my panels.

Big Anthologies: Bookends or Benchmarks? (Friday 16:30 – 18:00)

There’s a genre tradition of doorstop-sized anthologies that attempt to synopsise a period or style: Ascent of Wonder, The Weird, Twenty-First Century Science Fiction, and others. What makes these anthologies successful, or not? Does ‘success’ mean summarising a past conversation, or influencing the conversation that’s still going on? Or are they always and inevitably doomed enterprises? Is it possible to TOC an age, or a genre? Or are these sorts of anthologies in fact arguments, rather than snapshots?

  • Jo Walton (M)
  • Ellen Datlow
  • Jonathan Strahan
  • Jeff VanderMeer

YA on the Big Screen (Saturday 15:00 – 16:30)

The YA publishing boom has been accompanied by a boom in film adaptations, but while some have seen commercial success others have stalled. What does it take to transition from book to film? Are there any special considerations when working with a young adult story? Modern YA is a genre with distinctive tropes — how are these being transferred to the screen? How is “classic” YA adapted in that context? Is this to the original story’s benefit or detriment? Which YA books have successfully made the transition–for good or ill? What stories would make great films, but haven’t yet been done?

  • Carrie Vaughn (M)
  • Amy H. Sturgis
  • Erin M. Underwood
  • Thea James

Just Three Cornettos (Saturday 16:30 – 18:00)

The Simon Pegg/Nick Frost/Edgar Wright “Cornetto trilogy” concluded last year with The World’s End, following Sean of the Dead and Hot Fuzz. What is the trilogy’s place in British SF? The panel will discuss why the films’ endings are so unconventional, what the trilogy had to say about topics such as society and consumerism, masculinity and maturity, and the British landscape … And they’ll decide which fence gag is best.

  • Nick Hubble (M)
  • Paul Cornell
  • Rachael Acks
  • Philippa Chapman

Dropping The M (Monday 11:00 – 12:00)

We customarily divide the work of Iain (M) Banks into his sf and his mimetic fiction, but much of the mimetic fiction slips and slides into the fantastic. What if we threw this division out: what other ways of understanding his work can we find? Macro and micro fictions, fictions of family and of friendship, fictions of thinning and fictions of recovery?

  • Farah Mendlesohn (M)
  • Jude Roberts
  • Tony Keen
  • Anna Feruglio Dal Dan
Advertisements

Written by Martin

2 July 2014 at 19:47

Posted in sf

Tagged with

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: